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Longtime Reds broadcaster Brennaman retiring after 2019

Longtime Reds broadcaster Brennaman retiring after 2019

Hall of Fame broadcaster Marty Brennaman announced Wednesday that 2019 will be his 46th and final season as the voice of the Cincinnati Reds.

Brennaman, 76, has been calling Reds games since 1974 and is known for such taglines as "and this one belongs to the Reds" and "rounding third and heading for home."

Highlights of his long career in the booth include calling three World Series clinchers by Cincinnati (1975, 1976 and 1990) as well as Hank Aaron's 714th home run, Tom Seaver's 1978 no-hitter and Tom Browning's 1988 perfect game.

"To say that it's been an incredible ride -- that's what it's been. You folks have had a lot to do with it," an emotional Brennaman said on a video posted on the Reds' Twitter feed.

"You've accepted me as one of your own many years ago back in 1974. I feel like I've had a love affair that's gone through four-and-a-half decades because you all have been so good to me. I felt like you needed to know from the man himself, and that's me, that nobody can love you as much as I do. I'm going to miss a lot of things, but you folks are going to be right there at the top of the list. Thank you very much."

Brennaman received the Ford C. Frick Award in 2000, presented annually by the National Baseball Hall of Fame. He was inducted in the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Hall of Fame in 2005 and has been named Ohio broadcaster of the year 17 times -- including earlier this week.

Brennaman never was afraid to state his feelings, including controversial criticisms of such Cincinnati stars as Ken Griffey Jr., Adam Dunn and Joey Votto.

Report: White Sox offer to Machado is seven years, $175M

Report: White Sox offer to Machado is seven years, $175M

Free-agent infielder Manny Machado has a seven-year, $175 million offer on the table from the Chicago White Sox, according to ESPN's Buster Olney.

The White Sox, the Philadelphia Phillies and the New York Yankees are the teams that have expressed the most interest in the 26-year-old Machado, but it is believed only the White Sox have made an offer.

Machado, who played his first six seasons with the Baltimore Orioles before a mid-July trade to the Los Angeles Dodgers, had been reported to be seeking a contract in the 10-year, $300 million-plus range.

Machado, who has played shortstop and third base in the majors, is a career .282 hitter with 175 home runs and 513 RBIs. He twice has been in the top five in Most Valuable Player voting.

Last season, he hit .297 with a career-high-tying 37 home runs and career-high 107 RBIs combined between the Orioles and Dodgers. He also sported a .367 on-base percentage, above his .335 career average, and his .538 slugging percentage exceeded his career figure of .487.

Maddon says Cubs won't sign Harper

Maddon says Cubs won't sign Harper

It remains to be seen where coveted free agent Bryce Harper will wind up playing this season, but he apparently won't be a member of the Chicago Cubs.

A fan asked Cubs manager Joe Maddon during an appearance for the Union League Boys & Girls Club on Tuesday night if the team planned to sign the outfielder. According to ESPN, Maddon gave a succinct and clear response:

"Not going to happen."

The Cubs long had been thought to be a viable option for Harper once he hit free agency. For the Cubs, he'd represent a considerable outfield upgrade. For Harper, he'd be reunited with longtime friend Kris Bryant. The two were raised in Las Vegas and played together growing up.

Chicago, however, has signaled that it doesn't intend to expand the payroll this winter. They traded pitcher Drew Smyly to save salary and have remained steadfast that they are going to build from within.

"We feel as though all the ingredients are in the bowl already," Maddon said Tuesday, according to the Chicago Tribune. "It's already there. To just go out and purchase guys because some kids had a tough year is probably not good form."

A report over the weekend said the Philadelphia Phillies have emerged as the frontrunner for Harper, while the Washington Nationals hold out hope they can re-sign him. Given the Cubs' unwillingness to spend this offseason, it appears likely Maddon was not trying to fool other teams with his comments.

Washington made Harper, now 26, the No. 1 overall pick in the 2010 draft. In seven seasons with the Nationals, Harper hit .279 with 184 home runs and 521 RBIs. He was the 2015 National League MVP and is a six-time All-Star.

He is believed to be asking for a contract well in excess of $300 million.

Anaheim approves lease extension for Angels

Anaheim approves lease extension for Angels

The Los Angeles Angels are scheduled to play in Angel Stadium through the 2020 season after the City of Anaheim approved an extension to the lease late Tuesday night.

Owner Arte Moreno exercised a one-year opt-out provision in October, casting doubt about the team's future in Anaheim. Relocating within Southern California or renovating Angel Stadium remain options down the line.

City council approved the deal in a 5-2 vote, keeping the Angels in the only ballpark they've called home since 1966. Angel Stadium is the fourth-oldest home stadium in the major leagues.

"It is clear to me that the team's priority is to stay in Anaheim," Mayor Harry Sidhu said in a statement. "We need a plan to make that happen, and we need time to make that happen. This will give us time to find a deal that benefits our residents, with a goal of keeping baseball in Anaheim for another 50 years or more."

Moreno previously proposed $150 million in renovations, paid for without the use of taxpayer funds, but the previous mayor rejected the proposal. Within Moreno's plan was a stipulation that he could develop -- and pocket profits from -- the surrounding land while adding only $1 per year to the stadium lease.

Red Sox to visit White House on Feb. 15

Red Sox to visit White House on Feb. 15

The Boston Red Sox will be the next world champions to visit the White House, and there's no telling if the federal government shutdown will still be in effect when they arrive on Feb. 15. But clam chowder, Boston baked beans and lobster rolls better be on President Donald Trump's menu instead of fast food.

Team president Sam Kennedy told the Boston Globe on Tuesday, "We thought an earlier visit rather than waiting until later in the year made the most sense."

The Red Sox are scheduled to travel from their spring training camp in Fort Myers, Fla., in a quick, one-day turnaround. They also likely will visit the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

White the trip is not mandatory, Kennedy expects "a healthy representation of ownership, executives, coaches and players" to attend, even though Red Sox pitchers and catchers are set to report on Feb. 12, followed five days later by position players.

Red Sox manager Alex Cora plans to attend, through he has been critical of Trump's comments on Twitter that disputed the official conclusion that nearly 3,000 people died in Cora's native Puerto Rico because of Hurricane Maria in 2017. Cora's family was on the island when the hurricane hit.

"3000 people did not die in the two hurricanes that hit Puerto Rico. When I left the Island after the storm had hit, they had anywhere from 6 to 18 deaths," Trump tweeted in September. "As time went by it did not go up by much. Then, a long time later, they started to report really large numbers, like 3000."

Cora led a Red Sox delegation that included Kennedy and players Chris Sale, Rick Porcello and Christian Vazquez to Puerto Rico in January 2018 to aid the victims, and he called Trump's comments "disrespectful."

Clemson's national championship football team visited Trump at the White House on Monday, and the president said he ordered around 1,000 hamburgers in all from McDonalds, Wendy's and Burger King. The menu also included fries and pizza.

"So I had a choice," Trump told the players. "Do we have no food for you, because we have a shutdown, or do we give you some little quick salads that the first lady will make, along with the second lady, they'll make some salads.

"And I said, you guys aren't into salads. Or do I go out ... and send out for about 1,000 hamburgers. Big Macs. So we actually did that."

MLB notebook: Ex-Yankees pitcher Stottlemyre dies at 77

MLB notebook: Ex-Yankees pitcher Stottlemyre dies at 77

Longtime New York Yankees pitcher and pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre died Sunday in Seattle after a lengthy battle with cancer. He was 77.

Multiple media outlets reported the news of his death Monday, when he received various tributes on social media. Stottlemyre's wife, Jean, told The New York Times that he died as a result of complications of multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer.

Born in a small town in Washington, Stottlemyre was bound for the big city when Yankees scout Eddie Taylor discovered him at Yakima Valley Community College in Washington and signed him to a $400-per-month contract. He reached the big leagues in 1964, after a 13-3 season in Triple-A, when the Yankees were in a pennant race with a pitching staff plagued by injuries.

He turned into the ace of the staff, and by the time he retired in 1974, he'd compiled 164-139 lifetime record in 360 games, starting all but four of them. Stottlemyre had a career ERA of 2.97 and threw more than 250 innings in nine of his 11 seasons with the Yankees. He was a three-time 20-game winner and a five-time All-Star selection.

--The San Francisco Giants re-signed left-hander Derek Holland to a one-year contract with a club option for 2020, the team announced.

The deal includes a $6.5 million salary for 2019 and a $7 million option for 2020, with a $500,000 buyout.

Holland, 32, pitched a team-high 171 1/3 innings in his first season with the Giants in 2018. He was 7-9 with a 3.57 ERA and a team-leading 169 strikeouts in 36 games (30 starts).

--The Minnesota Twins announced the signing of former Los Angeles Angels closer Blake Parker to a one-year contract. ESPN reported the value of the contract at $3.2 million.

The 33-year-old right-hander appeared in 67 games for the Angels in 2018, posting a 3.26 ERA with 70 strikeouts, 19 walks and a team-high 14 saves in 17 opportunities.

Drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the 16th round in 2006, Parker owns a career 3.29 ERA in 229 relief appearances with the Cubs (2012-14), Seattle Mariners (2016), New York Yankees (2016) and Angels (2017-18).

Twins ink ex-Angels closer Parker to 1-year deal

Twins ink ex-Angels closer Parker to 1-year deal

The Minnesota Twins announced Monday the signing of former Los Angeles Angels closer Blake Parker to a one-year contract.

ESPN reported the value of the contract at $3.2 million.

The 33-year-old right-hander appeared in 67 games for the Angels in 2018, posting a 3.26 ERA with 70 strikeouts, 19 walks and a team-high 14 saves in 17 opportunities.

Drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the 16th round in 2006, Parker owns a career 3.29 ERA in 229 relief appearances with the Cubs (2012-14), Seattle Mariners (2016), New York Yankees (2016) and Angels (2017-18).

To make room on the 40-man roster, the Twins designated right-hander John Curtiss for release or assignment.

Former Yankees pitcher, coach Stottlemyre dies at 77

Former Yankees pitcher, coach Stottlemyre dies at 77

Longtime New York Yankees pitcher and pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre died Sunday in Seattle after a lengthy battle with cancer. He was 77.

Born in a small town in Washington, Stottlemyre was bound for the big city when Yankees scout Eddie Taylor discovered him at Yakima Valley Community College and signed him to a $400-per-month contract. He reached the big leagues in 1964, after a 13-3 season in Triple-A, when the Yankees were in a pennant race with a pitching staff plagued by injuries.

He turned into the ace of the staff, and by the time he retired in 1974, he'd compiled 164-139 lifetime record in 360 games, starting all but four of them. He had a career ERA of 2.97 and threw more than 250 innings in nine of his 11 seasons with the Yankees.

He was a three-time 20-game winner and a five-time All-Star selection.

In 1977, he joined the Seattle Mariners organization as a roving pitching instructor, and before the 1984 season, the Mets hired him as pitching coach, where he worked with Dwight Gooden, Ron Darling and Sid Fernandez during his 10 seasons with the team.

He never won a World Series as a player, but he was part of the 1986 Mets team that won the title.

After two years with Houston, Stottlemyre joined new manager Joe Torre with the Yankees in 1996, where he led a pitching staff that helped the Yankees win four World Series in five years. He resigned after the 2005 season, agitated with owner George Steinbrenner.

He worked despite being diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2000 and underwent multiple treatments, which sent the cancer into remission. It recurred in 2011, and he continued to battle the blood-marrow cancer throughout his remaining years.

On Oldtimers Day in 2015, a plaque honoring Stottlemyre was unveiled in Monument Park in Yankee Stadium.

"Today in this stadium, there is no one that's happier to be on this field than myself," he said, choking up. "This is such a shock to me because the era I played in is an era where, for the most part, the Yankees have tried over the years, I think, somewhat to forget a little bit. ... If I never get to come to another Oldtimers Day, I will take these memories and I'll start another baseball club, coaching up there, whenever they need me."

Stottlemyre is survived by his wife, Jean, and two sons, Todd and Mel Jr., both former major league pitchers. The couple's third son, Jason, died in 1981 of leukemia.

Giants re-sign LHP Holland to one-year deal

Giants re-sign LHP Holland to one-year deal

The San Francisco Giants re-signed left-hander Derek Holland to a one-year contract with a club option for 2020, the team announced Monday.

Financial terms were not disclosed, but Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reported the contract included a $6.5 million base salary for 2019.

Holland, 32, pitched a team-high 171 1/3 innings in his first season with the Giants in 2018. He was 7-9 with a 3.57 ERA and a team-leading 169 strikeouts in 36 games (30 starts).

During a sizzling six-start stretch from Aug. 15 to Sept. 12, he posted a 1.59 ERA and held opponents to a .197 batting average.

For the season, Holland held left-handed batters to the lowest slugging percentage (.189) of any pitcher in the majors.

Holland owns a 76-73 career record and 4.44 ERA over 10 seasons with the Texas Rangers (2009-16), Chicago White Sox (2017) and Giants.

Report: Machado has 8-year offer from White Sox

Report: Machado has 8-year offer from White Sox

Long rumored to be a strong suitor for free agent infielder Manny Machado, the Chicago White Sox have offered the four-time All-Star an eight-year contract, according to an ESPN report Sunday.

Citing league sources, the report added that one of Machado's other pursuers, the Philadelphia Phillies, would figure into the futures of Machado, as well as the other big-name free agent position player this off-season, outfielder Bryce Harper.

Harper and Machado have both been connected to the Phillies.

Machado, 26, who played his first six seasons with the Baltimore Orioles before a mid-July trade to the Los Angeles Dodgers, is believed to be seeking a contract in the 10-year, $300 million-plus range. Many have questioned whether Chicago would offer a 10-year deal, but the eight-year offer demonstrates the White Sox's seriousness.

Machado, who has played shortstop and third base in the majors, is a career .282 hitter with 175 home runs and 513 RBIs. He has twice been in the top five in Most Valuable Player voting, and finished ninth another season.

Last season, he hit .297 with a career-high-tying 37 home runs and career-high 107 RBIs combined between the Orioles and Dodgers. He also sported a .367 on-base percentage, above his .335 career average, and his .538 slugging percentage exceeded his career figure of .487.

Report: A's contingent meeting with Murray

Report: A's contingent meeting with Murray

Heisman Trophy winner Kyler Murray reportedly is meeting Sunday with representatives of the Oakland Athletics, who hope to persuade him to play professional baseball.

The A's selected Murray with the No. 9 overall pick in the MLB draft in June and gave him a $4.66 million bonus. He was to play quarterback at Oklahoma in 2018, then join the A's.

But with his football success, rumors have persisted that he will declare for the NFL draft and leave baseball behind.

USA Today's Bob Nightengale tweeted Sunday morning that A's president Billy Beane is leading the contingent to meet with Murray.

The deadline to enter the NFL draft is Monday.

Padres' Myers moving from 3B back to OF

Padres' Myers moving from 3B back to OF

Wil Myers says he is moving back to the outfield for the San Diego Padres this season.

Myers, who started 36 games at third base in August and September, called it a mutual decision reached with general manager A.J. Preller and manager Andy Green.

"It was more of a group decision," Myers said at San Diego's FanFest event on Saturday. "I did tell them I want to do what's best for the team going forward. Obviously, I want to win and whatever we can do to do that, I'm down for. ... I feel like both sides are happy."

Myers made six errors in 91 chances at the hot corner in 2018, posting a .934 fielding percentage at third.

Myers, 28, also started 30 games in left field, nine games in right field and two at first base last season.

The 2013 National League Rookie of the Year and a 2016 All-Star, Myers batted .253 with 11 homers and 39 RBIs in 83 games in 2018.

Blue Jays sign RHP Phelps to 1-year, $2.5M deal

Blue Jays sign RHP Phelps to 1-year, $2.5M deal

The Toronto Blue Jays have signed right-hander David Phelps to a one-year, $2.5 million deal with a club option for the 2020 season, the team announced Saturday.

Phelps, 32, missed the 2018 season after undergoing Tommy John surgery on March 26.

The reliever was 4-5 with a 3.40 ERA in 55 2/3 innings with the Miami Marlins and Seattle Mariners in 2017.

In six seasons, Phelps has a 30-33 record with a 3.89 ERA and 520 strikeouts in 553 2/3 innings. He played with the New York Yankees (2012-14) before joining the Marlins in 2015.

MLB notebook: Arenado, Rockies expected to reach deal

MLB notebook: Arenado, Rockies expected to reach deal

Colorado Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado, who is reportedly requesting $30 million in arbitration, didn't reach an agreement with the club on Friday, but there remains a possibility the two sides can avoid an arbitration hearing, ESPN reported.

The Rockies are offering $24 million, and ESPN reported the sides likely will settle in the $27 million range, above the $23 million that Josh Donaldson and the Toronto Blue Jays settled on last year.

A four-time All-Star, Arenado made $17.75 million last season. He led the National League with 38 homers in 2018 and batted .297 with 110 RBIs.

Among the other players who didn't agree to deals on Friday are right-hander Gerrit Cole and shortstop Carlos Correa of the Houston Astros. Philadelphia Phillies right-hander Aaron Nola, New York Yankees right-hander Luis Severino and Cleveland Indians right-hander Trevor Bauer also remained without contracts.

--Star outfielder Mookie Betts and the Boston Red Sox agreed to a one-year, $20 million deal to avoid salary arbitration, according to multiple reports.

Betts earned $10.5 million in 2018, according to Spotrac. Betts, 26, was the 2018 American League MVP and led the major leagues with a .346 batting average and a .640 slugging percentage. He had 32 home runs, 80 RBIs and 30 stolen bases.

He is a three-time All-Star and a three-time Gold Glove winner. Betts and the team will face arbitration in 2020 if they do not reach a long-term contract agreement.

--Free agent second baseman DJ LeMahieu agreed to a two-year, $24 million deal with the New York Yankees, according to multiple reports.

LeMahieu, 30, batted .276 with 15 homers and 62 RBIs last season for the Colorado Rockies. The 15 homers were a career best.

LeMahieu won the National League batting title with a .348 average in 2016. He was a two-time All-Star and won three Gold Gloves during seven seasons with the Rockies.

--The Los Angeles Dodgers have acquired catcher Russell Martin from the Toronto Blue Jays in exchange for a pair of minor-leaguers.

The Blue Jays sent Martin, who turns 36 next month, and cash to the Dodgers for right-hander Andrew Sopko and infielder Ronny Brito.

Canada's Sportsnet estimated the Blue Jays will send the Dodgers $16 million to $18 million to defray the $20 million Martin is owed in 2019. A four-time All-Star, Martin signed a five-year, $82 million deal with the Blue Jays in November 2014.

--National League Cy Young Award winner Jacob deGrom and the New York Mets agreed to a one-year, $17 million contract to avoid salary arbitration.

The 30-year-old deGrom went 10-9 with a microscopic 1.70 ERA in 32 starts last season. He struck out a career-best 269 in 217 innings while making $7.4 million. The right-hander also made history by winning the Cy Young Award with the fewest number of victories.

Rotation mate Noah Syndergaard also reached a deal, agreeing to a one-year, $6 million contract. The right-handed Syndergaard, 26, went 13-4 with a 3.03 ERA in 25 starts last season while making $2,975,000.

--Major league home run leader Khris Davis and the Oakland Athletics avoided arbitration when the slugger agreed to a one-year, $16.5 million deal, according to multiple reports.

Davis established career highs with 48 homers and 123 RBIs last season while making $10.5 million. His RBI total ranked second in the majors.

--The Arizona Diamondbacks avoided arbitration by reaching a one-year deal with left-hander Robbie Ray.

According to reports, Ray will receive $6.05 million this season. He went 6-2 in 24 starts last season with a 3.93 ERA and 165 strikeouts over 123 2/3 innings pitched.

Ray, 27, was a National League All-Star in 2017 when he went 15-5 with a 2.89 ERA in 28 starts.

--Infielder Alex Bregman should be ready for Opening Day after undergoing arthroscopic surgery on his right elbow, the Houston Astros announced.

Bregman, 24, had the surgery to remove loose bodies from the elbow and is expected to be limited at spring training.

Playing primarily at third base, Bregman enjoyed a career year in 2018, hitting .286 with 31 home runs, 51 doubles, 105 runs and 103 RBIs. He also earned his first All-Star Game nod and took home MVP honors after hitting the game-winning home run.

Rockies' Arenado heads toward hefty contract

Rockies' Arenado heads toward hefty contract

Colorado Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado didn't reach an agreement with the club on Friday but there remains a possibility the two sides can avoid an arbitration hearing, ESPN reported.

Arenado, 27, is reportedly requesting $30 million in arbitration, with the Rockies countering at $24 million. ESPN reported the two sides will likely settle in the $27 million range.

Either way, Arenado is set to exceed the $23 million that Josh Donaldson and the Toronto Blue Jays settled on last year.

Arenado, a four-time All-Star, made $17.75 million last season. He led the National League with 38 homers in 2018 and batted .297 with 110 RBIs.

Among other players who didn't agree to deals on Friday include right-hander Gerrit Cole and shortstop Carlos Correa of the Houston Astros. Philadelphia Phillies right-hander Aaron Nola, New York Yankees right-hander Luis Severino and Cleveland Indians right-hander Trevor Bauer also remained without deals.

The 28-year-old Cole went 15-5 with a 2.88 ERA in 32 starts, while the 24-year-old Correa batted just .239 with 15 homers and 65 RBIs in 110 games.

The 25-year-old Nola went 17-6 with a 2.37 ERA in 33 starts and finished third in the National League Cy Young balloting. Severino, 24, went 19-8 with a 3.39 ERA in 32 starts, and the 27-year-old Bauer went 12-6 with a 2.21 ERA in 28 appearances (27 starts).

Roundup: Betts, deGrom head busy day of signings

Roundup: Betts, deGrom head busy day of signings

A look at players who avoided salary arbitration by agreeing to contract terms on Friday:

Arizona Diamondbacks: LHPs Robbie Ray ($6.05 million) and Andrew Chafin ($1.945 million), RHP Taijuan Walker ($5.025 million), 3B Jake Lamb ($4.825 million) and OF Steven Souza Jr. ($4.125 million) agreed to one-year deals. Ray, 27, made $3.95 million last season when he went 6-2 with a 3.93 ERA and 165 strikeouts in 24 starts; the 28-year-old Chafin received an $800,000 raise after going 1-6 with a 3.10 ERA in 77 games; the 26-year-old Walker pitched in just three games before undergoing Tommy John surgery; Lamb, 28, batted .222 with six homers and 31 RBIs in 56 games; and 29-year-old Souza hit .220 with five homers and 29 RBIs in 72 games.

Atlanta Braves: RHPs Kevin Gausman ($9.35 million), Mike Foltynewicz ($5.475 million), Arodys Vizcaino ($4.8 million), Dan Winkler ($1.61 million) and LHP Sam Freeman ($1.575 million), INF Charlie Culberson ($1.395 million) and OF Adam Duvall ($2.875 million) agree to one-year deals. Gausman, 28, went 10-11 with a 3.92 ERA in 31 starts; Foltynewicz, 27, went 13-10 with a 2.85 ERA in 31 starts; Vizcaino, 28, went 2-2 with a 2.11 ERA and 16 saves in 39 appearances; the 28-year-old Winkler went 4-0 with a 3.43 ERA in 69 appearances; Freeman, 31, went 3-5 with a 4.29 ERA in 63 appearances; Culberson, 29, batted .270 with 12 homers and 45 RBIs in 113 games; and 30-year-old Duvall batted .195 with 15 homers and 61 RBs in 138 games with the Cincinnati Reds and Braves.

Boston Red Sox: OF Mookie Betts agreed to a one-year, $20 million deal after earning $10.5 million in 2018. Betts, 26, was the 2018 American League MVP and led the major leagues with a .346 batting average and also had 32 home runs, 80 RBIs and 30 stolen bases. RHP Steven Wright ($1,375,000) received a raise of $275,000 after the 34-year-old went 3-1 with a 2.68 ERA in 20 appearances (four starts).

Chicago Cubs: RHP Kyle Hendricks ($7.405 million), SS Addison Russell ($3.4 million), OF Kyle Schwarber ($3.39 million), LHP Mike Montgomery ($2.44 million) and RHP Carl Edwards Jr. ($1.5 million) reached one-year deals. Hendricks, 29, was 14-11 with a 3.44 ERA in 33 starts while making $4.175 million; Russell, 24, is currently suspended after a domestic-violence incident and batted .250 with five homers and 38 RBIs in 130 games; Schwarber, 25, batted .238 with 26 homers and 61 RBIs in 137 games while making $604,500; Montgomery, 29, went 5-6 with a 3.99 ERA in 38 appearances (19 starts); and Edwards, 27, went 3-2 with a 2.60 ERA in 58 appearances.

Chicago White Sox: RHP Alex Colome ($7.325 million) agreed to a one-year deal. Colome went 7-5 with 12 saves and a 3.04 ERA in 70 appearances.

Cincinnati Reds: 2B Scooter Gennett ($9.775 million), OF Yasiel Puig ($9.7 million), RHPs Tanner Roark ($10 million), Anthony DeSclafani ($2.125 million) and Michael Lorenzen ($1.975 million) and SS Jose Peraza ($2.775 million) agreed to one-year deals. Gennett, 28, batted .310 with 23 homers and 92 RBIs in 154 games; the 28-year-old Puig hit .267 with 23 homers and 63 RBIs in 125 games with the Los Angeles Dodgers before being traded; Roark, 32, went 9-15 with a 4.34 ERA in 31 games (30 starts) for the Washington Nationals; 28-year-old DeSclafani went 7-8 with a 4.93 ERA in 21 starts; Lorenzen, 27, went 4-2 with a 3.11 ERA in 45 appearances (three starts); and 24-year-old Peraza batted .288 with 14 homers and 58 RBIs in 157 games.

Colorado Rockies: RHPs Chad Bettis ($3.325 million) and Scott Oberg ($1.3 million) agreed to one-year deals. Bettis, 29, went 5-2 with a 5.01 ERA in 27 appearances (20 starts) while Oberg, 28, went 8-1 with a 2.45 ERA in 56 appearances last season.

Detroit Tigers: LHPs Matthew Boyd ($2.6 million), Blaine Hardy (unknown) and Daniel Norris ($1.275 million) agreed to one-year deals. Boyd, 27, went 9-13 with a 4.39 ERA in 31 starts; Hardy went 4-5 with a 3.56 ERA in 30 appearances (13 starts); and Norris, 25, went 0-5 with a 5.68 ERA in 11 games (eight starts).

Los Angeles Angels: LHPs Tyler Skaggs ($3.7 million) and Andrew Heaney ($3.4 million) and RHPs JC Ramirez ($1,901,000) and Nick Tropeano ($1,075,000) agreed to one-year deals. Skaggs, 27, went 8-10 with a 4.02 ERA in 24 starts; Heaney, 27, went 9-10 with a 4.15 ERA in 30 starts; Ramirez, 30, made $1.9 million last season when he had his season cut short after two starts and underwent Tommy John surgery; and 28-year-old Tropeano was 5-6 with a 4.74 ERA in 14 starts.

Miami Marlins: C J.T. Realmuto ($5.9 million) and RHPs Dan Straily ($5 million) and Jose Urena ($3.2 million) agreed to one-year deals. Realmuto, 27, batted .277 with 21 homers and 74 RBIs in 125 games, Straily went 5-6 with a 4.12 ERA in 23 starts and 27-year-old Urena went 9-12 with a 3.98 ERA in 31 starts.

Milwaukee Brewers: RHP Corey Knebel ($5.125 million) and 3B Travis Shaw ($4.675 million) agreed to one-year deals. Knebel, 27, went 4-3 with 16 saves and a 3.58 ERA in 57 appearances, while 28-year-old Shaw batted .241 with 32 homers and 86 RBIs in 152 games.

Minnesota Twins: RHP Jake Odorizzi ($9.5 million), OF Max Kepler ($3.125) and 3B Miguel Sano ($2.65 million) agreed to one-year deals. The 28-year-old Odorizzi went 7-10 with a 4.49 ERA in 32 starts; Kepler, 25, batted .224 with 20 homers and 58 RBIs in 156 games; and Sano, 25, hit .199 with 13 homers and 41 RBIs in 71 games.

New York Mets: National League Cy Young Award winner Jacob deGrom agreed to a one-year, $17 million contract. The 30-year-old deGrom went 10-9 with a microscopic 1.70 ERA in 32 starts last season while making $7.4 million. Fellow RHP Noah Syndergaard also reached a deal, agreeing to a one-year, $6 million contract. Syndergaard, 26, went 13-4 with a 3.03 ERA in 25 starts while making $2.975 million.

New York Yankees: OF Aaron Hicks ($6 million) and 1B Greg Bird ($1.2 million) agreed to one-year deals. Hicks, 29, batted .248 with 27 homers and 79 RBIs in 137 games while Bird, 26, batted .199 with 11 homers and 38 RBIs in 82 games.

Oakland Athletics: Major league home run leader Khris Davis avoided arbitration when the slugger agreed to a one-year, $16.5 million deal. Davis established career highs with 48 homers and 123 RBIs last season while making $10.5 million. Four other Athletics agreed to terms: outfielder Mark Canha ($2.05 million), left-hander Sean Manaea (unknown), second baseman Jurickson Profar ($3.6 million) and shortstop Marcus Semien ($5.9 million). Canha, 29, batted .249 with a career-best 17 homers to go with 52 RBIs in 122 games; Manaea, 26, went 12-9 with a 3.59 ERA in 27 starts before suffering a season-ending shoulder injury; Profar, 25, agreed to make $3.6 million after he batted .254 with 20 homers and 77 RBIs in 146 games for the Texas Rangers in 2018; and Semien, 28, will make $5.9 million, nearly double the $3.125 million he made in 2018 when he hit .255 with 15 homers and 70 RBIs in 159 games.

St. Louis Cardinals: OF Marcell Ozuna (unknown) and RHPs Michael Wacha ($6.35 million) and Dominic Leone (unknown) agreed to one-year deals. Ozuna, 28, batted .280 with 23 homers and 88 RBIs; Wacha, 27, went 8-2 with a 3.20 ERA in 15 starts; and Leone, 27, was 1-2 with a 4.50 ERA in 29 appearances.

San Diego Padres: OF Travis Jankowski agreed to a one-year, $1,165,000 contract. Jankowski, 27, batted .259 with four homers, 17 RBIs and 24 steals last season.

San Francisco Giants: LHP Will Smith ($4.225 million) agreed to a one-year deal. Smith, 29, went 2-3 with 14 saves and a 2.55 ERA in 54 appearances.

Seattle Mariners: LHP Roenis Elias (unknown) and outfielder Domingo Santana ($1.95 million) agreed to one-year deals. Elias, 30, went 3-1 with a 2.65 ERA in 23 appearances (four starts), and the 26-year-old Santana batted .265 with five homers and 20 RBIs in 85 games for the Milwaukee Brewers last season.

Toronto Blue Jays: RHPs Marcus Stroman ($7.4 million) and Ken Giles ($6.3 million) agreed to one-year deals. Stroman, 27, went 4-9 with a 5.54 ERA in 19 starts, and 28-year-old Giles went 0-3 with 26 saves and a 4.65 ERA in 55 appearances.

Washington Nationals: SS Trea Turner ($3.725 million) agreed to a one-year deal. Turner, 25, batted .271 with 19 homers, 73 RBIs and 43 steals while playing all 162 games.

Mets, deGrom agree to one-year, $17M deal

Mets, deGrom agree to one-year, $17M deal

National League Cy Young Award winner Jacob deGrom and the New York Mets agreed to a one-year, $17 million contract on Friday to avoid salary arbitration.

The 30-year-old deGrom went 10-9 with a microscopic 1.70 ERA in 32 starts last season. He struck out a career-best 269 in 217 innings while making $7.4 million.

The right-hander also made history by winning the Cy Young Award with the fewest number of victories.

The two-time All-Star is 55-41 with 2.67 ERA in 139 starts over five seasons with the Mets.

Rotation mate Noah Syndergaard also reached a deal, agreeing to a one-year, $6 million contract.

The right-handed Syndergaard, 26, went 13-4 with a 3.03 ERA in 25 starts last season while making $2.975 million.

Blue Jays trade C Martin to Dodgers

Blue Jays trade C Martin to Dodgers

The Los Angeles Dodgers have acquired catcher Russell Martin from the Toronto Blue Jays in exchange for a pair of minor leaguers, the Dodgers announced Friday.

The Blue Jays are sending Martin and cash to the Dodgers for RHP Andrew Sopko and infielder Ronny Brito.

Canada's Sportsnet estimated the Blue Jays will send the Dodgers $16 million to $18 million to defray the $20 million Martin is owed in 2019. He signed a five-year, $82 million deal with the Blue Jays in November 2014.

Martin, who turns 36 next month, appeared in 90 games with the Blue Jays last season. He hit .194 with 10 home runs and 25 RBIs.

In 13 seasons, he has a .249 career batting average with 185 home runs and 751 RBIs in 1,610 games. He has thrown out 31 percent of runners attempting to steal.

A four-time All-Star, Martin began his career with the Dodgers (2006-10), then played two years each with the New York Yankees and Pittsburgh Pirates before signing with the Blue Jays.

The Dodgers were in need of a second catcher to join Austin Barnes after Yasmani Grandal signed a free-agent contract with the Milwaukee Brewers on Wednesday.

Brito, who will turn 20 in March, ranked 23rd among Dodgers prospects, according to MLB Pipeline. In rookie ball last season, he hit .295 with 11 home runs and 55 RBIs.

Sopko, 24, divided last season between High-A and Double-A teams. He had a combined 6-5 record and a 3.52 ERA in 117 2/3 innings pitched. He struck out 121 batters and walked 27.

Davis agrees to one-year, $16.5M deal with A's

Davis agrees to one-year, $16.5M deal with A's

Major league home run leader Khris Davis and the Oakland Athletics avoided arbitration on Friday when the slugger agreed to a one-year, $16.5 million deal, according to multiple reports.

Davis established career highs with 48 homers and 123 RBIs last season while making $10.5 million. His RBI total ranked second in the majors.

Davis has three straight seasons of at least 40 homers and 100 RBIs. He leads the majors with 133 homers during the stretch and ranks second with 335 RBI.

Four other Athletics agreed to terms: outfielder Mark Canha, left-hander Sean Manaea, second baseman Jurickson Profar and shortstop Marcus Semien.

Canha, 29, batted .249 with a career-best 17 homers to go with 52 RBIs in 122 games. He reportedly agreed to $2.05 million after making $547,500 last season.

Manaea, 26, went 12-9 with a 3.59 ERA in 27 starts before suffering a season-ending shoulder injury and his 2019 salary wasn't immediately known. He tossed a no-hitter against the Boston Red Sox on April 21 and made $550,000 last season.

Profar, 25, agreed to make $3.6 million after he batted .254 with 20 homers and 77 RBIs in 146 games for the Texas Rangers in 2018. He made $1.05 million last season and was acquired by the Athletics in December.

Semien, 28, will make $5.9 million, nearly double the $3.125 million he made in 2018. He hit .255 with 15 homers and 70 RBIs in 159 games and set career highs for runs (89), hits (161) and steals (14).

Diamondbacks avoid arbitration, reach deals with Ray, Chafin

Diamondbacks avoid arbitration, reach deals with Ray, Chafin

The Arizona Diamondbacks avoided arbitration by reaching one-year deals with left-hander Robbie Ray and southpaw reliever Andrew Chafin, the team announced on Friday.

According to reports, Ray receives $6.05 million for next season and Chafin signed a deal worth $1.945 million.

Ray, 27, went 6-2 in 24 starts last season with a 3.93 ERA and 165 strikeouts over 123 2/3 innings pitched.

Ray made $3.95 million last season, his fourth with the Diamondbacks.

He was a National League All-Star in 2017 when he went 15-5 with a 2.89 ERA in 28 starts.

Chafin, 28, appeared in 77 games for the Diamondbacks last season, posting a 3.10 ERA over 49 1/3 innings and striking out 53 batters. He had a 1-6 record.

His salary represents an $800,000 raise over 2018.

Arizona also reached a one-year deal with catcher John Ryan Murphy on Thursday.